2021 Articles
Volume 3 Issue 1

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Letter To The Editor

Megan Oxley, MD

Volume 3 Issue 1

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Letter To The Editor

Scott Allen, MD; Rachel Allen, MD

Volume 3 Issue 1

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Ayahuasca Tea in the United States: Why and how?

LJ Standish ND, PhD; Juan Giménez PhD; and Victoria G Hale, PhD

Volume 3 Issue 1

Abstract:

Ayahuasca Tea is available through numerous venues. We are developing traditional Ayahuasca Tea for the group treatment of several mental health indications, including major depression, anxiety, addiction, PTSD, and unresolved grief (U.S. FDA path). We are engaging with Amazonian traditional Ayahuasceros and shamans to learn how best to develop this medicine with respect for indigenous healing rituals. Our research group has chosen to develop traditional Ayahuasca Tea—as opposed to synthesized alkaloids, or what is known as "pharmahuasca." Challenges inherent in botanical drug development as well as historical, cultural, and legal issues are discussed. The concept of reciprocity is introduced, and the Ayahuasca Tea reciprocity imperative is discussed.

 

Disclosure: 

LS, JG, and VH are employees of Sacred Medicines, a mission-driven Delaware Public Benefit Corporation

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Towards Consilience Between Research Paradigms and Spiritual Practice

Thomas D. Meacham, M.D.

Volume 3 Issue 1

Abstract:

Spirituality is widely recognized as a function of health, of wholeness, and in some fashion central to psychological healing. In recent decades western medicine has found renewed interest in the spiritual aspects of healing with the development of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, a form of treatment commonly observed to induce spiritual and mystical experiences. Questions about the role of the mystical experience in psychological healing have led to the desire to research the subject. However, this state is well known to be difficult to study objectively due to its ineffable quality, problems with defining terms, and apparent theoretical and philosophical differences from research paradigms. This paper attempts to find the most fundamental common theoretical ground possible in order to attain consilience between research as it is performed and the spiritual experience towards the goal of improved theory and better treatment designs and clinical outcomes. This is done by conceptualizing the spiritual experience as a homeostatic mechanism to optimize the various codes of life. This places the spiritual experience in the same framework as other aspects of the social and biological sciences. As a special case, the mystical experience is conceptualized as associated with directly accessing codes created through early childhood social learning. Boundary cases and counterintuitive implications of this paradigm are discussed.

Keywords: Research, spirituality, mystical state, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy

Volume 3 Issue 2

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Editorial Review: Trial of Psilocybin versus Escitalopram for Depression

Gershom Hernandez, MD

Volume 3 Issue 2

Editorial

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Is Psychedelic Therapy Integrative Medicine?

Matthew Hicks, ND, MS

Volume 3 Issue 2

Abstract:

Outside of FDA-approved clinical trials, psychedelics remain illegal though there are indications that this status will change in the coming years. An unanswered and seldom discussed question is, who will be authorized to provide psychedelic therapy? Will it only be board-certified psychiatrists and licensed psychotherapists? What about integrative providers? This paper will discuss the parallels between psychedelic medicine and integrative health, their origins, definitions, and safety.

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A Comprehensive Review of Potential Uses of Ayahuasca in Psychiatry

Adam Bertroche, DO

Volume 3 Issue 2

Abstract:

Objective: This paper aims to provide a review of primarily the human studies of the use of ayahuasca for psychiatric illness and outline the pharmacology and effects of ayahuasca. 

Method: Literature review

Discussion: Ayahuasca has a unique delivery method and mechanism of action involving serotonin and sigma-1 receptors with downstream effects on dopamine and glutamate. There have been positive studies for using ayahuasca in psychiatric disorders. However, more extensive clinical trials and safety profiling are required before use in clinical practice.

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Synthetic Cannabinoid-Induced Compulsive Sexual Behaviors: A Case Report

Amanda Klass, DO

Volume 3 Issue 2

Abstract:

Compulsive sexual behavior, also referred to as hypersexuality, is defined as an excessive preoccupation with sexual fantasies, urges, or behaviors that are difficult to control, cause distress, or negatively impact one’s health, job, relationship, or other parts of life [1]. Slavin et. al. explored the link between marijuana and hypersexuality and found preliminary evidence for a relationship in university students [2]. This result could be due to the interaction between the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic systems whereby behavioral-related rewards and reinforcement roles are experienced through cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels [3]. This case report serves to provide data on the effects of synthetic cannabinoid-induced compulsive sexual behaviors.

Volume 3 Issue 3

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Practical and Ethical Considerations for Psychedelic Therapy and Integration Practices

Ismail Lourido Ali, J.D., Geoff Bathje, Ph.D., Roxanne R. Hallisey, B.S., Leslie Booher, J.D., M.B.A., Brooke Novick, L.M.F.T., Allison Feduccia, Ph.D.

Volume 3 Issue 3

Abstract:

While psychedelic-assisted therapies are currently being studied for several indications in clinical trials, there is legal and ethical ambiguity for mental health professionals concerning these compounds. Seventy-six mental health professionals completed an online survey asking them to rank their interest in topics related to psychedelic therapy, research, legal obstacles, barriers to incorporating psychedelics in practice, and terminology related to the field. Results showed that providers want more clearly defined terminology and operating procedures concerning business matters such as malpractice and clinic guidelines, legal and ethical clarity on administering psychedelics in private practice and integration work, and further opportunities for psychedelic therapy training. The survey responses were reflected upon through the legal and ethical lens of the current psychedelic landscape. 

 

Key Words: psychedelic integration, psychedelic practice, ethics, harm reduction, therapy

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Newspaper Coverage of Psilocybin – Sentiment and Frequency (1989-2020)

Dax Oliver, M.A.

Volume 3 Issue 3

Abstract:

A growing body of medical research has focused on the chemical compound psilocybin in recent years [1,2]. However, this research is not merely a scientific issue but also a social and political one. In the 1960s, psilocybin and other psychedelics were often ingested outside of research settings [3]. This alarmed many people, resulting in severe legal restrictions on psilocybin research [4]. Today, many advocates hope that it will avoid the negative public sentiment of the 1960s [5]. To help gauge public sentiment about other psychoactive compounds, some studies have examined newspaper coverage [6,7]. The present study hoped to build a similar gauge with newspaper coverage of psilocybin. The author hypothesized that general sentiment about psilocybin has become more positive among American newspapers in recent years and that the annual number of newspaper articles mentioning psilocybin has increased. To test these hypotheses, all mentions of psilocybin were examined in four regional American newspapers from January 1, 1989, to December 31, 2020. Contrary to the hypotheses, a significant rise in positive sentiment was seen in only one of these newspapers, and the annual number of articles mentioning psilocybin significantly increased in only one newspaper. These results could be a warning to psilocybin advocates about the risk of negative social and political sentiment growing again..

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Psychedelics and Response Duration

Gregory Jones, M.D.; Hunter Hinman M.D.; Elizabeth Mays M.D.; Daniel Liaou M.D.

Volume 3 Issue 3

Viewpoint 

Volume 3 Issue 4

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Internal Family Systems: A Therapeutic Model for Each Stage of the Psychedelic Experience

Nancy L. Morgan, PhD, Patrycja Radecka, PgDip, and Coen de Koning, BSc

Volume 3 Issue 4

Viewpoint 

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Successful Self-Medication of a Major Depressive Episode with Repeated Administration of LSD: A Case Report

Jennifer Lyke, PhD and Trey Brasher, BS

Volume 3 Issue 4

Abstract:

This report describes the successful treatment of Major Depression by self-medicating with LSD. The subject of this case was a young, Caucasian, unmarried man who matches the demographic characteristics of people most likely to self-medicate and those most likely to use psychedelic drugs. Details of the participant’s experience are helpful in understanding many aspects of psychedelic self-administration. They may also apply to other cases, such as psychosocial factors that contributed to developing depressive symptoms; history and symptoms of the disorder; prior substance abuse history; rationale for self-medication; choice of drug and strategy; psychological mechanisms for symptom alleviation; possible adverse effects; other psychosocial consequences; and follow-up experiences and reflections since self-medication.

KEYWORDS: LSD, Major Depression, self-medication, case study

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Psilocybin as an Abortive Treatment for Intractable Migraines: A Case Report

Alicia McCullough, MD.

Volume 3 Issue 4

Abstract:

Over a billion individuals worldwide suffer from an acute migraine attack in a single year. Approximately 1% of these individuals suffer from status migrainosus, which is defined as a migraine that lasts longer than 72 hours. These chronic intractable migraines are often refractory to conventional treatment interventions. In this case report, the use of the psychedelic agent psilocybin is discussed as an alternative treatment modality for chronic intractable migraines. The pathophysiology of migraines is examined, and the literature on psychedelic substances in treating migraines is reviewed.