2020 Articles

Volume 2 Issue 4

Ketamine-Hypnosis Package (KHP): A Clinical Case Study for the treatment of depression and addiction administering Ketamine with Hypnotherapy

Sophie-Charlotte Adler, M.Sc., Mario Schieb, MD

Volume 2 Issue 4

Abstract

Background. There are few studies on ketamine and its properties to work with addiction (alcohol, opioid, cannabis, and cocaine use disorder). The studies show that ketamine treatment can help reduce craving and support abstinence [14]. Hypnotherapy is an evidence-based treatment gaining popularity for treating addiction, but not everybody can be hypnotized due to different levels of suggestibility. Our clinical practice has observed that people who are not highly hypnotizable, such as patients with obsessive-compulsive disorders, become more suggestible accompanied by our newly developed method called “Ketamine-Hypnosis package” (KHP). In this case report and study, we want to explore and evaluate the potential of KHP in working with addiction. Diagnostic and a qualitative content analysis should give profound insights into the treatment process and method.

Case Report. The subject is a 48-year-old male German Social Worker with treatment-resistant depression, suicidal thoughts, obsessive behavior, and several forms of addiction. The patient received a 10-day treatment at Instituto Dr. Scheib, with Diagnostic, rTMS, neurofeedback, and four sessions of KHP. Every Ketamine infusion remained with a standard dose of 0.5 mg/kg R-Ketamine for about 45 minutes. 

Results. Primary outcome measures included change in depression as measured by the BDI-II with a reduction from 44, highly depressed, to a score of 3, no depression, and change of symptoms measured by the SCL-90 R that showed a clear reduction in almost every factor vs. baseline. The qualitative content analysis of the KHP sessions identified nine categories; Setting, Intervention, Body, Control, Feelings, Insights/Realizations, Addiction, Depression and Imagery. QEEG measurements before and after treatment showed a pattern of over-representation of slow brain activity with closed eyes, which can be observed in fluctuating concentration and volatile impulse control. Follow-Up Data with BDI-II one week after treatment showed factor 3 and 5 weeks after treatment factor 15.

Conclusions. The 10-day-treatment program improved numerous important treatment outcomes in one substance-dependent adult engaged in hypnotherapeutic modification, including promoting less substance abuse, diminishing craving, and reducing the risk of relapse. Further research is needed to replicate these promising results in a larger sample.

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